countingdeadwomen-us:

Jeffersonville P.D. said they’ve talked to some of Tammy’s friends who spoke with her Wednesday night. When Tammy didn’t show up to work Friday friends and coworkers got worried for her safety.

A friend called Jeffersonville police asking they go and check on her. When officers arrived to 329 Locust Street, they found Tammy dead in the bathroom.

“There was violence done to her body. Officers noticed that immediately.”

The man who answered the door, Tammy’s boyfriend, 33-year-old Joseph Oberhansley, has been arrested and charged with murder.

“Right now we believe there was some trouble that had started in the last day or two with them.”

This is not Oberhansley’s first brush with the law or even a murder charge. In 1998, as a 17-year-old in Utah, Oberhansley killed his girlfriend just days after she gave birth to their child. He then shot his mother and shot himself. He pleaded guilty and got 15 years in prison. He served 13 and was released in 2012.

(More at link)

Maybe it wasn’t appropriate for me to insert all that stuff about my mom on that post.

Im not sure.

cultofkimber:

cayacayadeenyall:

cultofkimber:

quantumfemme:

seekingwillow:

priceofliberty:

salon:

Is this a human rights violation?

They’re being forced to risk their lives, so yeah I would say this is a violation of their right to life.

___
Everytime I look around, the US Govt, or some part there-of on  State or National level; is finding a way to reintroduce slavery.

Fucking hell. The prison industrial complex finds new ways to shock, revile and disgust every day.

This isn’t “a way to reintroduce slavery,” though. The 13th Amendment, which ended slavery, was very precisely written:

"Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

This is why black people make up 14% of the US population and 40% of the prison population and why Native Americans make up less than 1% of the US population but 2% of the prison population.

This isnt slavery. These are people who commit crimes like murder and child molestation that are being punished for there actions through physical labor. God forbid they do something other than sit on their asses all day in jail.

Literally nothing you just said is based in fact. 
The men fighting these fires are all low-level offenders, primarily with charges for drugs, robbery, and other non-violent offenses (and, fyi, non-violent offenses are what 50% of state prisoners and about 90% of federal prisoners are incarcerated for). US prison has largely been a privatized, for-profit industry since the 1980s. Law changes like mandatory minimums for low-level crime have ensured that the incarceration rate has done nothing but skyrocket because private prisons need a steady flow of inmates to turn profit and our government is contractually obligated to provide that steady flow. Hell, drug-related charges account for over half of that rise of rate. Marginalized groups are targeted disproportionately for incarceration through systemic poverty, inaccessible education, social instability, etc (all which increase risk of drug abuse and other criminal behavior), racial profiling by LEOs, and by being given much harsher sentences than more privileged counterparts. And that’s without even touching on wrongful conviction rates, which are about 6% for violent crimes and estimated to be much higher with lesser offenses. 
And criminals are sent to prison as punishment, not for punishment. The confinement and denial of personal agency is the punishment. And prison is meant to serve two purposes: punishment and rehabilitation. Prison work programs are about neither—they exist primarily to defray costs of housing inmates (and, thus, increase profits for private prisons). And bondage, subjugation, and forced labor for other’s financial gain is practically the textbook definition of slavery, so idk what to tell you. There are lots of ways to keep prisoners from “sitting on their asses all day” that don’t involve treating these men and women as unworthy of humane treatment, empathy, and compassion. Hell, work programs are even a really viable option for that when approached with the right intentions.   
Seriously, I really urge you to do some reading about mass incarceration, racial disparities in incarceration, the privatization of the prison industry, etc. if you’re going to have an opinion on this stuff because ignorance isn’t a good look on anyone. 

Ok I would really like to add a spin onto this. 
1st person - you are SO wrong. Murderers, violent offenders never see the outside of a prison fence for their work details. Let alone given a (very real) opportunity to run. Say. While fighting a fire. The people given these work details are low level offenders. Even STILL people who are higher security, violent offenders do deserve the chance to work in risk free, appropriate environments. You do not get to use someone’s crimes to justify inhumane treatment.
Prisoners should be paid for their work. 100% there is no argument there. And prison is certainly a form of slavery, racial disparity and privatization prove that time and time again.


But prison work really can reform inmates. I want to offer just one example.
My mother is a prisoner in Georgia. Non-violent repeat drug offender. Currently serving a very very hefty sentence for selling meth.

She was also a fire fighter. With 20 fellow inmates. The re-incarceration rate of women who participate in this program is 1 for every 20. The women serve as fire fighters without pay. For 3 years, or the time of their release. They are trained. Certified. Allowed to work outside the prison fences. Allowed to work as firefighters after their release.
This is my mother. In prison.

again, during training.



Addiction, repeat prison sentences, domestic violence and poverty are all battles my mom has to fight. Her prison work details help her have something to be proud of. She constantly talks about this detail. She talks about fighting fires in Georgia mountains. Doing search and rescues for lost campers. Saving homes and farms, and people from fires. It’s one of the only things in her adult life she can be proud of. She has moved on to a different one (helping women study for and obtain their GEDs) and soon she’ll be requesting to move to another (working on a farm in southern Georgia. She likes farming.) But this is something that I hang onto because its one of the only good things I’ve ever seen my mother do.
She is probably a rare bird. Maybe her program(s) are way different?To my knowledge she has never been forced into a specific detail. She is indeed forced to work, but they (inmates) get to choose to at least some degree. Maybe it’s different for female inmates? Maybe it varies drastically by state?
One good program doesn’t negate the abuse that happens in all the others. I would however point out, there isn’t a single quote from an inmate describing their experience or their feelings on this. 
cultofkimber:

cayacayadeenyall:

cultofkimber:

quantumfemme:

seekingwillow:

priceofliberty:

salon:

Is this a human rights violation?

They’re being forced to risk their lives, so yeah I would say this is a violation of their right to life.

___
Everytime I look around, the US Govt, or some part there-of on  State or National level; is finding a way to reintroduce slavery.

Fucking hell. The prison industrial complex finds new ways to shock, revile and disgust every day.

This isn’t “a way to reintroduce slavery,” though. The 13th Amendment, which ended slavery, was very precisely written:

"Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

This is why black people make up 14% of the US population and 40% of the prison population and why Native Americans make up less than 1% of the US population but 2% of the prison population.

This isnt slavery. These are people who commit crimes like murder and child molestation that are being punished for there actions through physical labor. God forbid they do something other than sit on their asses all day in jail.

Literally nothing you just said is based in fact. 
The men fighting these fires are all low-level offenders, primarily with charges for drugs, robbery, and other non-violent offenses (and, fyi, non-violent offenses are what 50% of state prisoners and about 90% of federal prisoners are incarcerated for). US prison has largely been a privatized, for-profit industry since the 1980s. Law changes like mandatory minimums for low-level crime have ensured that the incarceration rate has done nothing but skyrocket because private prisons need a steady flow of inmates to turn profit and our government is contractually obligated to provide that steady flow. Hell, drug-related charges account for over half of that rise of rate. Marginalized groups are targeted disproportionately for incarceration through systemic poverty, inaccessible education, social instability, etc (all which increase risk of drug abuse and other criminal behavior), racial profiling by LEOs, and by being given much harsher sentences than more privileged counterparts. And that’s without even touching on wrongful conviction rates, which are about 6% for violent crimes and estimated to be much higher with lesser offenses. 
And criminals are sent to prison as punishment, not for punishment. The confinement and denial of personal agency is the punishment. And prison is meant to serve two purposes: punishment and rehabilitation. Prison work programs are about neither—they exist primarily to defray costs of housing inmates (and, thus, increase profits for private prisons). And bondage, subjugation, and forced labor for other’s financial gain is practically the textbook definition of slavery, so idk what to tell you. There are lots of ways to keep prisoners from “sitting on their asses all day” that don’t involve treating these men and women as unworthy of humane treatment, empathy, and compassion. Hell, work programs are even a really viable option for that when approached with the right intentions.   
Seriously, I really urge you to do some reading about mass incarceration, racial disparities in incarceration, the privatization of the prison industry, etc. if you’re going to have an opinion on this stuff because ignorance isn’t a good look on anyone. 

Ok I would really like to add a spin onto this. 
1st person - you are SO wrong. Murderers, violent offenders never see the outside of a prison fence for their work details. Let alone given a (very real) opportunity to run. Say. While fighting a fire. The people given these work details are low level offenders. Even STILL people who are higher security, violent offenders do deserve the chance to work in risk free, appropriate environments. You do not get to use someone’s crimes to justify inhumane treatment.
Prisoners should be paid for their work. 100% there is no argument there. And prison is certainly a form of slavery, racial disparity and privatization prove that time and time again.


But prison work really can reform inmates. I want to offer just one example.
My mother is a prisoner in Georgia. Non-violent repeat drug offender. Currently serving a very very hefty sentence for selling meth.

She was also a fire fighter. With 20 fellow inmates. The re-incarceration rate of women who participate in this program is 1 for every 20. The women serve as fire fighters without pay. For 3 years, or the time of their release. They are trained. Certified. Allowed to work outside the prison fences. Allowed to work as firefighters after their release.
This is my mother. In prison.

again, during training.



Addiction, repeat prison sentences, domestic violence and poverty are all battles my mom has to fight. Her prison work details help her have something to be proud of. She constantly talks about this detail. She talks about fighting fires in Georgia mountains. Doing search and rescues for lost campers. Saving homes and farms, and people from fires. It’s one of the only things in her adult life she can be proud of. She has moved on to a different one (helping women study for and obtain their GEDs) and soon she’ll be requesting to move to another (working on a farm in southern Georgia. She likes farming.) But this is something that I hang onto because its one of the only good things I’ve ever seen my mother do.
She is probably a rare bird. Maybe her program(s) are way different?To my knowledge she has never been forced into a specific detail. She is indeed forced to work, but they (inmates) get to choose to at least some degree. Maybe it’s different for female inmates? Maybe it varies drastically by state?
One good program doesn’t negate the abuse that happens in all the others. I would however point out, there isn’t a single quote from an inmate describing their experience or their feelings on this. 

cultofkimber:

cayacayadeenyall:

cultofkimber:

quantumfemme:

seekingwillow:

priceofliberty:

salon:

Is this a human rights violation?

They’re being forced to risk their lives, so yeah I would say this is a violation of their right to life.

___

Everytime I look around, the US Govt, or some part there-of on  State or National level; is finding a way to reintroduce slavery.

Fucking hell. The prison industrial complex finds new ways to shock, revile and disgust every day.

This isn’t “a way to reintroduce slavery,” though. The 13th Amendment, which ended slavery, was very precisely written:

"Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.”

This is why black people make up 14% of the US population and 40% of the prison population and why Native Americans make up less than 1% of the US population but 2% of the prison population.

This isnt slavery. These are people who commit crimes like murder and child molestation that are being punished for there actions through physical labor. God forbid they do something other than sit on their asses all day in jail.

Literally nothing you just said is based in fact. 

The men fighting these fires are all low-level offenders, primarily with charges for drugs, robbery, and other non-violent offenses (and, fyi, non-violent offenses are what 50% of state prisoners and about 90% of federal prisoners are incarcerated for). US prison has largely been a privatized, for-profit industry since the 1980s. Law changes like mandatory minimums for low-level crime have ensured that the incarceration rate has done nothing but skyrocket because private prisons need a steady flow of inmates to turn profit and our government is contractually obligated to provide that steady flow. Hell, drug-related charges account for over half of that rise of rate. Marginalized groups are targeted disproportionately for incarceration through systemic poverty, inaccessible education, social instability, etc (all which increase risk of drug abuse and other criminal behavior), racial profiling by LEOs, and by being given much harsher sentences than more privileged counterparts. And that’s without even touching on wrongful conviction rates, which are about 6% for violent crimes and estimated to be much higher with lesser offenses. 

And criminals are sent to prison as punishment, not for punishment. The confinement and denial of personal agency is the punishment. And prison is meant to serve two purposes: punishment and rehabilitation. Prison work programs are about neither—they exist primarily to defray costs of housing inmates (and, thus, increase profits for private prisons). And bondage, subjugation, and forced labor for other’s financial gain is practically the textbook definition of slavery, so idk what to tell you. There are lots of ways to keep prisoners from “sitting on their asses all day” that don’t involve treating these men and women as unworthy of humane treatment, empathy, and compassion. Hell, work programs are even a really viable option for that when approached with the right intentions.   

Seriously, I really urge you to do some reading about mass incarceration, racial disparities in incarceration, the privatization of the prison industry, etc. if you’re going to have an opinion on this stuff because ignorance isn’t a good look on anyone. 

Ok I would really like to add a spin onto this. 

1st person - you are SO wrong. Murderers, violent offenders never see the outside of a prison fence for their work details. Let alone given a (very real) opportunity to run. Say. While fighting a fire. The people given these work details are low level offenders. Even STILL people who are higher security, violent offenders do deserve the chance to work in risk free, appropriate environments. You do not get to use someone’s crimes to justify inhumane treatment.

Prisoners should be paid for their work. 100% there is no argument there. And prison is certainly a form of slavery, racial disparity and privatization prove that time and time again.

But prison work really can reform inmates. I want to offer just one example.

My mother is a prisoner in Georgia. Non-violent repeat drug offender. Currently serving a very very hefty sentence for selling meth.

Mom

She was also a fire fighter. With 20 fellow inmates. The re-incarceration rate of women who participate in this program is 1 for every 20. The women serve as fire fighters without pay. For 3 years, or the time of their release. They are trained. Certified. Allowed to work outside the prison fences. Allowed to work as firefighters after their release.

This is my mother. In prison.

link

again, during training.

here

Addiction, repeat prison sentences, domestic violence and poverty are all battles my mom has to fight. Her prison work details help her have something to be proud of. She constantly talks about this detail. She talks about fighting fires in Georgia mountains. Doing search and rescues for lost campers. Saving homes and farms, and people from fires. It’s one of the only things in her adult life she can be proud of. She has moved on to a different one (helping women study for and obtain their GEDs) and soon she’ll be requesting to move to another (working on a farm in southern Georgia. She likes farming.) But this is something that I hang onto because its one of the only good things I’ve ever seen my mother do.

She is probably a rare bird. Maybe her program(s) are way different?To my knowledge she has never been forced into a specific detail. She is indeed forced to work, but they (inmates) get to choose to at least some degree. Maybe it’s different for female inmates? Maybe it varies drastically by state?

One good program doesn’t negate the abuse that happens in all the others. I would however point out, there isn’t a single quote from an inmate describing their experience or their feelings on this. 

The Lumineers - Scotland

The Lumineers // Scotland

darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.
darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.

darning-socks:

You’re allowed to be sad, but please don’t think that nobody loves you.

sica49:


"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!
Teach the babies that their words matter yess
sica49:


"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!
Teach the babies that their words matter yess
sica49:


"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!
Teach the babies that their words matter yess
sica49:


"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!
Teach the babies that their words matter yess

sica49:

"Rahm Emanuel is not caring about our schools; he is not caring about our safety. He only cares about his kids. He only care about what he needs. He do not care about nobody else but himself.

He let Barbara Byrd-Bennett, a woman that’s from Detroit who don’t even know the streets of Chicago where I’m from, come in and close these schools.” [x]

Look at the passion y’all!!!

Teach the babies that their words matter yess

bagelarms:

a lot of ppl seem confused on what cultural appropriation is so lemme break it down

IT IS NOT: enjoying food from another culture, enjoying music from another culture, learning about another culture, or learning another language

IT IS: using another culture as a costume, wearing religious articles as accessories when you are not a follower of that religion, using a race as a mascot, disrespecting religious or cultural practices. 

invisiblelad:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

It’s one thing to misplace your keys, your wallet, a receipt from Macy’s or your favorite pen, but Georgia’s secretary of state cannot account for approximately 40,000 voter-registration applications that, if processed, would enfranchise predominantly black and Hispanic Georgians.

According to an Al-Jazeera report, it’s a sentiment that the staffers at Third Sector Development are expressing. The nonprofit organization was on a mission to register as many black and Hispanic people in the state of Georgia as possible so that voter turnout for the upcoming midterm elections in November would be high. And they were successful at it, until they received word that about half of the applications they submitted for processing have gone missing in action.

“Over the last few months, the group submitted some 80,000 voter-registration forms to the Georgia secretary of state’s office—but as of last week, about half those new registrants, more than 40,000 Georgians, were still not listed on preliminary voter rolls. And there is no public record of those 40,000-plus applications, according to state Rep. Stacey Adams, a Democrat,” Al-Jazeera explained.

Georgia Secretary of State Brain Kemp explained that his office is not doing anything differently from how it usually processes applications. But some people aren’t buying his story, seeing as how he’s a Republican, and black and Hispanic people tend to vote for Democrats.

Georgia Republicans have been raising eyebrows for some time now with regard to early voting and voter-ID issues. One state Republican didn’t like how black and Hispanic voters had easy access to early-voting opportunities.

The “Republican whip of the state Senate complained that DeKalb County, Ga., was making it too easy for minorities to vote by allowing early voting in an area mall close to many predominantly African-American churches,” Think Progress reports.

Third Sector Development is not taking lightly the news that no one knows what became of its hard work to get people to register to vote. The group is going to court so that a judge can look into it.

“To that end, Third Sector Development announced yesterday that, after weeks of fruitless negotiations with the state, they were going to court to find out the status of the missing registrations—or, more to the point, the eligibility of more than 40,000 potential voters,” Al-Jazeera reports.

Read more at Al-Jazeera and Think Progress.  

Source: Diana Ozemebhoya Eromosele for The Root

Sweet land of liberty…


(◡‿◡✿)

I am obsesed with this show.

(◡‿◡✿)

I am obsesed with this show.

(◡‿◡✿)

I am obsesed with this show.

(◡‿◡✿)

I am obsesed with this show.

(◡‿◡✿)

I am obsesed with this show.

All you need to know about Sansa in this book is that she has a direwolf – a giant, monstrous wolf, a half-mythological monster, a killing machine – and she names it Lady.

Shmoop (via kissfistthat)

You’re goddamn right she did.

(via brainstatic)

(via curiousgeorgiana)

I’m applying for a manager role at work.

My manager is leaving for a new role, and I am applying to take her spot. 

I’m trying to figure out how I can make myself a more attractive candidate.

Because I am up against some really amazing people. 

That’s the tough part about working at a place like where I work. Everyone is awesome. Everyone who is applying deserves this spot. But there is 1 spot and 3 candidates (or more! 3 that I know of.). We never hire externally for these positions. Which I think makes it even tougher 

I’m interviewing with 6 different people for this position. AND doing “mock” work to show how I would handle different situations.

I’m reaching out to my previous bosses and asking for letters of recommendation. I hope they agree to write some for me!

I’m going to gather everything I can and treat this interview like I have never met these people before in my life (which really, I work with them every single day. So that’s gonna be funny / interesting.) 

I’m not sure what to do. Other than try my damnedest. 

I don’t like feeling like I’m competing against my co-workers.

Any advice?

lisha-like-a-fisha:

livingwvwild:

Shopping for insurance. Glad I’m not a woman…

Why the fuck do women cost more?

Child birth. Supposedly.

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Though she be but little she is fierce. My name is Kristen.
23, feminist southern woman living in Washington, DC, so I'm always unhappy about rent, sweet tea, and the patriarchy.

Game of Thrones, comics, my pets, and cooking make me happy.

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